Lexington Piano Teacher Ahra Oh

Pianist Ahra Oh was born in Seoul, South Korea, and started playing piano at age 5. Ms. Oh received a Bachelor’s degree in piano performance at Sookmyung Women’s University where she studied with pianist Jungae Sohn. Following that, she moved to the United States to continue her musical education in 2009. Dr. Oh attained a…

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Lexington violin teacher Ainur Tulendiyeva

A native of Almaty, Kazakhstan violinist Ainur Tulendiyeva is a Boston based performer and teacher. Passionate about the orchestral canon, Ainur has performed with the State Symphony Orchestra in Kazakhstan, and the State chamber orchestra “Camerata of Kazakhstan”, as well as the KunmingInternational Philharmonic in China. As an educator, Ainur has taught at the Kunming…

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Violinist Daniel Broniatowski

Born in Cleveland, Ohio, USA, violinist Daniel Broniatowski has performed in many parts of the United States and Europe. He has had the privilege of studying with some of the world’s most eminent teachers schooled in the Russian virtuosic technique of violin playing. Dr. Broniatowski holds a Bachelor of Music Degree in violin performance from…

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Lexington Violin Teacher Sophie Wang

Violinist Sophie Wang received her Master of Music and Graduate Diploma from New England Conservatory and her Bachelors at Columbus State University’s Schwob School of Music. Her principal teachers include Don Weilerstein, Sergiu Schwartz, and William Terwilliger. She has performed in Carnegie Weill Hall and has been featured as a soloist with the South Carolina Philharmonic…

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Lexington Piano Teacher Tessa Ying

Pianist Tessa Ying’s journey in music started as a pianist at age 4, growing up in a musical family in Singapore and gaining a strong foundation in classical piano, earning the DipABRSM and Associateship Diploma Trinity College of Music by age 13. Through her teenage years, she was invited to perform at venues like Esplanade…

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Music Lessons

Every now and then, a music school will lose a student due to “lack of interest” or “too many after-school activities”. These scenarios are often seen as “the nature of the beast” and “business as usual” for many schools, since we can’t please everyone. Yet, there are often some unexplored paths out there to help…

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